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Analog Moods

I haven't blogged in a while, because people don't really do that anymore I guess.  Twitter and other social media is a bit more ephemeral I guess.

Over the past few years I've been shooting film as much as possible.  I can't claim to be some sort of purist, as I shoot a ton of digital photos for my kid's sporting events and school activities.  Here are a few musings and tips.

 

  • There are no same day or 1 hour developing places within 25 miles of where I live now.  That is sad.
  • There are local bay area spots that will develop film and do a great job, but is not cost effective for a casual shooter like me.  Photoworks San Francisco is an amazing place, but I can't afford to use them all the time. ( https://www.photoworkssf.com/
  • My go-to place for developing is Dwayne's Photo in Kansas.  I use them for C41, Cross processing E6 to C41, Black and Black and White.  They charge about $10 USD for a process and scan.  I've used them for both 35mm and 120 and the quality is good.  I forget the exact resolution on their gear, but they come out around 8MP.  ( http://www.dwaynesphoto.com/ )
  • Thrift Stores and second hand shops have great deals.  I picked up a flawless 135mm f2.8 lens for my Pentax K1000 for $5 USD.  I even have an adapter to use it on my Canon DSLR too.  Great glass! 
  • You can get decently priced film online through BH Photo and Adorama, but sometimes you want to try something new.  Lance Rothstein's store spools up wacky old films that were used for radiography processes, surveillance, or slide reproduction for use to experiment.  Not cheap, but it is worth it!  ( http://www.labeauratoire.com/shop/index.html )
Shooting film is fun.  People see you change the rolls and it starts conversations.  It makes you slow down and think about composing a shot.  It makes you strategize about how you can capture what you want in 20-36 frames.  By no means is it a religion or have rules, as it is just about exploring your gear and creating quality images over quantity.  Generally when I shoot a sporting event for my kids, I will generate 600 to 800 images in an hour.  Over half will go in the trash bin.  Trying to fit an event into one or two 36 exposure rolls can be challenging, but can be rewarding. 
 
 

 

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